• Leigh

How to Make Sourdough Stollen Christmas Bread

I posted this recipe last year and am posting it again as the stollen is so good and makes a wonderful Christmas gift. Plus, now is a great time to make the bread. The stollen will keep, if kept cold, for days (or in my case, weeks). Making a traditional Christmas bread or stollen isn't hard, but it is a process. This isn't an instant bread. Nonetheless, the wait is worth it. Sourdough stollen is incredibly good and rich tasting, definitely worthy of the Christmas season, and a special Christmastime treat. So try it!


The recipe I'm posting turns out a large, heavy loaf studded with dried fruits, nuts, and white and dark chocolate chips. A little orange zest adds a slight citrus zing and highlights the sourdough tang. If you'd prefer, you can use a "fruitcake mix" of candied peels, pineapple pieces, and cherries. For me, making the stollen is an easy process, even though I need three days to do it. The primary reason is that I let my dough sit in a cool place overnight for two rises. I put my dough in our unheated sunroom, which is about the temperature of the refrigerator (or a little lower sometimes). The slow, overnight rises improve the flavor of the bread and let me limit my hassle with the dough. On day one, I get the bread started. Day two, I punch the dough down and shape it. On day three, I let the bread come to room temperature and continue its rise. Then I bake the bread, slather it with melted butter, and dust it with a thick coating of powdered sugar (this is not a "diet" bread). The butter/sugar combination helps the bread keep longer, as does the sourdough process. So, if you want a bread for Christmas that you can make now, this sourdough stollen is the answer. You'll want to eat the bread before Christmas, though, especially as you smell it baking and see it in its finished form. I recommend making two stollen--one to taste test now and one for later!

How to Make Sourdough Stollen Christmas Bread